Forage Facts

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Come see us at Farm Tech Days!
Come and see Form-A-Feed at Farm Technology Days!
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Making the most of your hay
Preserving and maximizing your feed resources is crucial for the financial wellbeing of your operation. Use best management practices and forage enhancement tools to maximize the quality of your hay.
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Preserving baled hay
The optimal moisture level for baling hay is 13% to 17%. Over one-half of baled hay produced is damaged by not hitting this level at baling. This damage is due to baling too wet or baling too dry. Using a forage preservative can help improve the quality of your baled hay by preventing mold growth.
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Assess alfalfa stands for winterkill
Temperature fluctuations and lack of snow cover over the winter in some areas may have affected the health of alfalfa stands. Now is the time to assess stands and determine if action is required. Even if plants are not dead, they may be injured and in need of attention.
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Controlling molds, mycotoxins, and wild yeast in forages
As the winter feeding season moves along, we are now reaping the benefits or dealing with the challenges from last year’s crop. Now is the time to take time to evaluate and make plans for next year’s forage season and crop plans. It’s also an excellent time to evaluate your forage preservative program and whether the program/product you used met your goals and objectives.
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Preservative Aids in Fermentation and Improves Forage Quality
Harvesting quality forages is vital to the profitability and production of your dairy herd. Even under good weather conditions, harvesting and storing high quality feeds can be a challenge. By understanding the fermentation process and the use of a preservative like Crop Cure®, you can improve the quality of your forages.
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Planning for forage production needs
When you begin planning for your forage needs, you need to consider your options and the factors that affect your ability to produce and store quality forages. These factors include the amount of land you have available, the fertility of the soil, the supplementation options available to you, and your storage facilities.
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Allocating forages by cattle class
Make the best and most efficient use of your forages based on quality by feeding them to the appropriate class of cattle.
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Components of Forage Quality
Not all forages are equal in their capacity to produce milk or meat. Measuring quality in forages and other roughages involves more than chemical composition. Forage quality is based on multiple factors.
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Fall alfalfa harvest management
Many producers like the option of gaining additional forages by harvesting a fall crop of alfalfa. However, use caution when completing this practice. When done at the incorrect time, fall harvest can increase the chance of winter kill by interfering with accumulation of root reserves and decrease next season’s production.
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